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SharePoint – Is That Really Ninja?


Posted 2012.05.11
by Peter Ekerot

We at tretton37 never do anything half arsed. We’re into SharePoint and we mean it. We are ninjas, even on SharePoint!

I firmly believe that SharePoint is truly ninja. What other system is awesome for collaboration straight out of the box, useful as a content management tool, has document versioning and workflows, can calculate large spreadsheets, batch convert documents, or integrate with obscure backend systems? SharePoint can do all of that and much more.

SharePoint can exist on its own servers, be it real ones or virtual but it can also exist at Microsoft Data centers; courtesy of SharePoint Online.
SharePoint has evolved over the course of more than ten years. Many of the core concepts that where there from the beginning are still there. Some of the refinements in the latest installment are an enhanced enterprise search (especially with FAST), a rather impressive “My Site”, and a very useful taxonomy (tagging) system.

SharePoint is also a large and extensive development platform. It can solve business problems, and a rather full range of business problems at that.

However, there are some dark clouds in the otherwise blue skies of SharePoint. It does not excel as a content management platform for public-facing internet sites without some deep thinking and special implementation details. It is not very mobile or tablet friendly out of the box, although some of the recent cumulative updates have addressed some of the problems, among other things.

So, where is the ninja stuff?

SharePoint as a development platform is huge. The foundation is .NET Framework 3.5, which might not be the latest and greatest but does the job. There’s Business Connectivity Services (BCS) to connect to any other system imaginable, either using WCF services or custom code – giving great integration possibilities. With the Client Script Object Model (CSOM) and custom tools like SPServices, one can build really nice, productive and fluid user interfaces on top of SharePoint.

As with any platform one needs to work with the grain of the fabric when developing SharePoint. What’s different from other web technologies or frameworks like ASP.NET MVC is the sheer size of the fabric we have to work with and the rather steep learning curve. Building properly on top of SharePoint requires a very good understanding of how the platform works and what parts to use for what purpose, and believe me; there are many parts. Beyond that developer tooling may sometimes be tedious at best. For instance one needs a full server installation just for development, which makes development start-up time for new projects significantly longer than with other web technologies.

The ninja part comes with deep experience in developing for SharePoint, choosing the right approach for the problem, applying standard features or custom development. A problem can often be solved in one of many different ways, it takes a ninja to know the right one.
And this is just for developing solutions. There’s room for much more under the SharePoint flag; Configuration management, Infrastructure, Integration, Security and more.

On the topic of SharePoint and ninja or not, I think the following piece by Mark Rackley is explaining it rather well, especially the twitter quote:

“@mrackley: Here’s an interesting question. Is it possible to be a “Junior Architect” in SharePoint? I think by its nature it’s a senior position.”

“@cmcnulty2000: I once met a junior surgeon. Didnt use him though. (my favorite response)”


There are so many facets of SharePoint solutions and development that a single person can’t really know it all (except some people – but a select few have cleared that certification).

Want to know more? Send me an e-mail or leave a comment

3 Responses to “SharePoint – Is That Really Ninja?”

Joakim
Posted on May 11, 2012 at 13:47

Good thoughts on SharePoint!

Johan Frisell
Posted on May 13, 2012 at 17:15

Interesting! I agree with you in many ways. I like to look at SharePoint as a second framework instead of a complete product. Knowing when to use its OOB functionality and when to build your own complements is the key to building kick-ass stuff, or ninja as you guys would put it. This, I believe, is also one of the main “issues” that makes SharePoint so complex and hard to learn as a developer.

Peter Ekerot
Posted on May 15, 2012 at 07:26

Thank you for your views Johan!

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